Genesis 1:1-24 from the Peshitta

P'shitta Tanakh

The Pshitta Tanakh is the ancient Scriptures translated into Lishana Aramaya (Aramaic language) from the original Hebrew text which pre-dated the Greek Septuagint text (LXX). The Aramaic Tanakh uses many Hebraic terms, many times transliterating the words and phrases rather than translating them. Often times the Aramaic Peshitta and the LXX agree against the Masoretic text. The Masoretic text is not the original Hebrew that was used by the translators of the Aramaic Pshitta. In other words, the text used by those who translated the Aramaic Pshitta is much older than the Masoretic text. The Aramaic Pshitta Tanakh (the Aramaic Jewish Bible) was completed during the first century), while the standardized Masoretic text was completed between the seventh and tenth centuries C.E.

The Aramaic Jewish Bible is still used by Hebrew-Aramaic speaking peoples for study of the Scriptures and use in liturgy in the East.

Click Here to Go to the
English translations
from the Aramaic Pshitta Tanakh


Click Here to Go to the
Aramaic Peshitta Tanakh
and Targumim Forum


A Note to Our Visitors: Many of you may be unaware of the passing of Yaaqub Younan-Levine a few years ago. His library, Biblioteca Aramaica, originally located in North Carolina, a collection of Hebrew and Aramaic texts and scholarly works was purchased in its entirety from the Younan-Levine family on January 15, 2014 by Nehemiah Cohen. The translation of the Pshitta Tanakh has now resumed and will be published online periodically. Thank you for your patience.

Thus says יהוה: Stand in the ways and see; ask for the old
paths, and watch where the good path is and walk by it, and
you will find rest for your souls.

(Ketava d'Eramya Nebya 6:16)




Copyright © 2007-2014 by Ya'aqub Younan-Levine, and 2014-2016 by Nehemiah Cohen

































The Aleppo Codex has been referred to as the most accurate version of the Hebrew scriptures in existence. Why? The standard Hebrew text used by Orthodox Jews today to write their Torah scrolls (and the same text used by some Christians to translate the "Old Testament") "contain several thousands of errors." Read more about this. [Click here to go back to the top of the page]